Georgia Aggravated Assault and Battery Laws

Jul 20, 2022

An assault or battery conviction can have severe implications for your life, personally and professionally. Only a knowledgeable lawyer familiar with Georgia’s criminal court system will determine the best options for a favorable outcome at the negotiating table.

Aggravated assault and battery crimes carry adverse consequences in Georgia, including a sentence of between 3 and 25 years in prison. Therefore, if you are accused of any of these crimes, it is in your best interest to hire a qualified Georgia assault and battery defense attorney who understands Georgia assault and battery laws.

WHAT IS ASSAULT AND BATTERY IN GEORGIA?

Assault and battery are two different crimes under Georgia criminal law. Assault refers to the threat or physical attempt to cause physical harm to another person. It also includes a threat of actions that makes a person feel uncomfortable or afraid of imminent violence.

On the other hand, the battery is the actual act of violence, such as hitting another person with a fist or striking someone with an object. Any form of battery crime in Georgia carries stiff penalties if you are charged with the offense.

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT IN GEORGIA

Assault crimes range in severity, and you can be charged with either simple assault or aggravated assault, depending on the circumstances of your case. Aggravated assault is considered a felony in Georgia, and it is committed:

  • With the intention of robbing, murdering, or robbing.
  • With a weapon or deadly object that can be used in a manner that causes serious bodily harm.
  • If a firearm is discharged from a vehicle.

AGGRAVATED BATTERY IN GEORGIA

Like aggravated assault, aggravated battery is considered a felony in Georgia. It occurs when a person knowingly causes serious bodily harm to another person, such as severe disfigurement, loss of a limb, or loss of use of a limb.

WHAT ARE THE PENALTIES FOR AGGRAVATED ASSAULT AND BATTERY IN GEORGIA?

An offender charged with an aggravated assault or battery in Georgia faces the following penalties:

  • Minimum jail terms range from one to 20 years (jail terms can run up to 50 years for intent to rape a child younger than 14).
  • Restitution
  • Up to $100,000 in fines

Certain aggravating circumstances can elevate assault or battery charges. These circumstances include:

  • If the crime occurs in a public transit vehicle or station (punishable by 3-5 years in prison)
  • Discharging a firearm from a vehicle (up to 5 years in prison)
  • If the crime is committed against some victims, such as an old or pregnant person or law enforcement officer. For example, if an offender commits an aggravated battery or assault against a public safety officer, such as a firefighter, correctional officer, or police officer, they can face a minimum jail term of up to 10 years, depending on the circumstances of the case.

GET IN TOUCH WITH A GEORGIA ASSAULT AND BATTERY DEFENSE ATTORNEY

An assault or battery conviction can have severe implications for your life, personally and professionally. Only a knowledgeable lawyer familiar with Georgia’s criminal court system will determine the best options for a favorable outcome at the negotiating table.

Contact us to discuss your case confidentially with Ryan Swingle, the lead assault and battery defense attorney at Ryan Swingle Law.